Thursday, March 15, 2007

The District "Made a Mistake"

Concerned Women for America is blasting an Illinois high school for urging students not to tell their parents about its mandatory homosexual indoctrination program. Deerfield High School in Chicago has a class called "Freshman Advisory," in which ninth-graders are required to attend a panel discussion led by the Gay-Straight Alliance Network. The panel features homosexual upperclassmen telling students about their sexual experiences.

Jim Brown from One News Now reports. Click HERE for full report.
Listen HERE for a report from Americans for Truth on this story.
Lisa Black from the Chicago Tribune reports with a more open-minded point of view on this story. Click HERE for her story.
I am a little torn on what is fact here. First the school district has the students sign a confidentiality agreement saying they would not tell anyone about the discussions the upperclassmen are having with the freshman, but parents have the right to pull their children out of the classroom if homosexuality is being discussed.
I have included Deerfield High Schools Process for Excusing Students from Instructional Activities.
My question is why would a school district have students sign a confidentiality form but yet they can be pulled out of class if parents disagree with the discussions on sexual orientation? Something is not balancing out here.
It sounds like another David Parker story to me. I will keep you updated.
Scia

6 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

“…mandatory homosexual indoctrination program…”

So the school is trying to turn kids into homosexuals? Since homosexuals can’t procreate like most people, they’re recruiting?

Don’t panic though; it’s really unlikely that any of those kids will suddenly go to their parents exclaiming how gay they’ve become from the “indoctrination” day at school.

Although I will agree that something fishy is going on at that school. I mean, where did they get all these kids that are gay? It must be something in the water.


Ken Weaver

8:31 PM, March 15, 2007  
Blogger SCIA said...

Ken,

I am laughing my a** off over your comments.

I don't agree with your statement of:

"...it’s really unlikely that any of those kids will suddenly go to their parents exclaiming how gay they’ve become from the “indoctrination” day at school."

That is not the point. The point that the story can make, is that it is innapropriate to spend tax dollars to have freshman sit through a class with upperclassmen discussing their sexual experiences either they be of a homosexual or heterosexual nature. On top of that, have these students sign a confidentiality form. Kind of strange!!

Good job.

Scia

9:18 PM, March 16, 2007  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hey Scia, I couldn’t agree more. I do believe a small amount of sexual health should be in the school though. I remember in the 5th grade my Father took me outside and explained the “birds and the bees” but he seemed unable to tell me other things that were really necessary to the conversation. He didn’t mention condoms, oral sex, the pill and other things that are part of the whole equation. My Father’s stance was “…don’t do it until you’re married!” leaving me uneducated to other facts. So in a sense I needed the school to educate me on some of the problems of unprotected sex in the real world. I didn’t need to know other kids’ sexual experiences; I needed to know the facts. Not another person’s views; I got plenty of that from friends.

On the issue of the school attempting to force students into “secrecy” is unforgivable. That will only go to widen the proverbial divide between parents and their children. Children should know that there is nothing to fear from telling your parents anything; if that fear exists it should be the fault of the parents alone; not by children and certainly not by schools using the general mistrust that exists between generations. Some of those reading this may find me a poor parent because of what I taught my son about sex; so I’ll ask any of those people this: How many of your children came to you and said “Dad, I’m seriously thinking about having sex with my girlfriend.”

Ken Weaver

6:44 PM, March 17, 2007  
Blogger SCIA said...

Ken,

Great job man.

You said:

"He (your dad) didn’t mention condoms, oral sex, the pill and other things that are part of the whole equation."

Yah, a hard thing to talk about, no doubt about it!! Even the thought of my kids asking me questions about this is scary to think about.

I do believe in what you are trying to say. Schools do need to talk about the "birds and the bees", but for a mature age, say around 6th grade, but like you say "stick to the facts about sex" and not focus on agenda based sexual experiences which have no educational value, but have plenty of indoctrination value.

You said:

"Children should know that there is nothing to fear from telling your parents anything; if that fear exists it should be the fault of the parents alone;..."

Right on the money!!

You said/asked:

"So I’ll ask any of those people this: How many of your children came to you and said “Dad, I’m seriously thinking about having sex with my girlfriend.”

This is the type of openness we need from our kids if we are to see that they stay safe in life.

You said:

"Some of those reading this may find me a poor parent because of what I taught my son about sex;"

What did you teach your son??

7:09 PM, March 18, 2007  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Basically it came to me telling him that sex is primarily for showing affection to the one you love. I also explained that I’m not some guy walking around with rainbows covering my eyes and that I knew kids are likely to have sex with or without their parent’s knowledge. I told him that it was more important to know that you are ready for sex than to rush for it. I explained there was only one crime possible for him to commit that would cause me to shut him away; rape. I explained that rape is not just the act of forcing intercourse, but it includes slipping a girl a pill, coercion, or even to take advantage of a girl who got a little too tipsy. If a woman wouldn’t say yes stone cold sober; but it becomes yes after a few too many drinks; it is still rape. I told him that a girl has a right to say no anytime she felt like it, even after penetration; and that he must respect that decision; if he couldn’t, he had no business putting himself in that position. I showed him how to use a condom; that no matter if the girl is on the pill he must show responsibility for his actions. I warned him that if an angry father showed up on my doorstep, that he would not be able to hide from him, for I would make sure that father had his words with my son. I told him it was okay to look at porn; I told him masturbation is nothing to be ashamed of; I told him how one night stands can leave you feeling empty; I told him that if a girl was willing and they both felt ready for that sexual step, that he was responsible for making darn sure that that experience was not something she looked back upon with regret, but with fondness. I explained how that would be impossible if he didn’t show her the respect to have her first time be in a place she feels comfortable; not a car’s back seat, an abandoned house, or an open field. I told him that he would know better than anyone else on the planet if he was ready for sex, and if he reached that time, he didn’t need to consult me. I told him it would not be me to judge his sexual activities; it would be his own conscience. When he came to me explaining how he thought he was ready for sex; I simply asked him that if he was truly ready, would he be coming to me looking for permission?

Lastly I told him everything I knew about sex; the good, the bad and the ugly. He knew that there would never be any punishment from me or his mother for any sexual activity. I empowered him to make his own decisions; and he has never failed to make me proud. I answered any question he asked as well as those he didn’t. Our conversations were frank and to the point. I used terminology he could understand and explained how many of those terms are considered crude. Our conversations were a little guarded at first as he was somewhat embarrassed, but he overcame that embarrassment and began to ask more questions frequently. He knows that sex is not dirty or disgusting; but beautiful when done right. I was downright permissive when it came to sex. If he brought a girl over and took her to his room, I allowed him to close the door. He knew I would never barge into his room unannounced, and he knew his privacy would be upheld. I bought him a 3 pack of condoms when I showed him how to put one on, and told him that if he ever needed more all he had to do was ask. The odd thing is, he has never asked.

Ken Weaver

9:59 PM, March 18, 2007  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

“Yah, a hard thing to talk about, no doubt about it!! Even the thought of my kids asking me questions about this is scary to think about.”

Why? Why is sex difficult to talk about? There was only one thing I thought was difficult to talk about and that was drugs. I found myself being somewhat hypocritical saying “drugs do this and do that, so don’t do any because it can hurt you” I’ve always been open with my son. I felt that was the best way to point out the mistakes I made, and the hope I held that he would not repeat them. He made some of his own mistakes with drugs, but I’m still happy he took them nowhere near as far as I did.

Ken Weaver

6:14 AM, March 19, 2007  

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